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Thermal Performance Data

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Product  Total Unit U-Factor
 Total Unit SHGC
 Visible Light Transmittance
UV Block
The Horizon, Yellowstone or PrimeLok Single Hung
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)



0.49
0.34



0.59
0.31


82%
57%


42%
84%
The Solaris, Yosemite, or PrimeLok Double Hung
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)


0.49
0.35


0.58
0.30


82%
54%


42%
84%
The Horizon, The Solaris, Yellowstone, Yosemite or PrimeLok Single Slider
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)



0.49
0.34



0.55
0.31



82%
56%



42%
84%
The Horizon, The Solaris, Yellowstone, Yosemite or PrimeLok Picture Window
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)




0.49
0.33

 


0.62
0.32

 


82%
59%

 


42%
84%

The Eclipse, Grand Mesa or TruLok
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)


0.49
0.35

0.58
0.30
 
82%
54%

42%
84%

The Solstice, Grand Teton or GrandLok
Clear
Low E and Air (Average)



0.49
0.35


0.58
0.30


82%
54%


42%
84%
The Aurora or Cascades Casement / Awning
Clear
Low E and Argon (Average)


0.45
0.31


0.56
0.31


82%
72%



42%
84%

Terminology

Emissivity is a measure of a surface's ability to emit long-wave infrared radiation or room temperature radiant heat energy. Emissivity varies from 0 (no emitted infrared) to 1 (100% emitted infrared). The lower the emissivity, the lower the resultant U-Value.

U-Value is the amount of heat transmitted by the window. The lower the number, the more efficient the window is in reducing winter heat loads and costs. Expressed in Btu/hr.ft2.F.

R-Value designates a window's resistance to heat flow. This number is the inverse of the U-Value: the higher the number, the more efficient the window in reducing winter heating costs. Expressed in hr.ft2.F/Btu.

Solar Heat Gain Coefficent is the fraction of incident solar radiation entering a home through the windows. The lower the number, the better the window is at preventing solar gain - critical to reducing summer cooling costs.